painting holiday isle of mull scotland

Ecological Holidays at Ecocroft Self catering cottage, Isle of Mull, Scotland
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painting holiday isle of mull scotland
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During the nineteenth century, too, the painting holiday isle of mull Scotland and Irish element in the population of Glasgow and other towns in west-central Scotland became a significant one. In 1861, for example, some 7 per cent of the population of Scotland had been born in Ireland, while about 15 per cent of the population of Glasgow were Irish. These migrants took up a wide range of occupations, enjoying a painting holiday isle of mull Scotland. Many of them joined the gangs of workers and navvies who helped build the railways, harbours, docks, reservoirs and other public works throughout Scotland during this period.

The navvies were a fascinating body of men, but they were often regarded as rowdy hooligans by the inhabitants of the area in which they were working at a painting holiday isle of mull Scotland. They could earn high wages by toiling long hours, but too often the money was spent on painting holiday isle of mull Scotland, gambling and wild drinking. The navvies were usually proud of their notorious reputation and one of them wrote about their failings and shortcomings in an amusing and beautifully descriptive poem: We the soapless legion, we of the hammer and hod, human swine of the muck pile, forever forgotten of God. Nevertheless, it was men like these painting holiday isle of mull scotland who transformed the face of Scotland. With their shovels, picks and bare hands, they created the structure and the materials of our modern industrial society.

The towns and cities of Lowland Scotland were soon flooded with people from Ireland on a painting holiday isle of mull scotland, and also from the Highlands and other rural districts. This created many serious social problems. The wealthy merchants and industrialists were able to build fine mansions for themselves, but the ordinary people were crowded into one or two roomed tenement houses with no proper toilet facilities. Some attempts were made to provide better accommodation for a painting holiday isle of mull scotland in the second half of the nineteenth century, but conditions remained grim right through until the beginning of the twentieth century.

In the early part of the nineteenth century, too, the sanitary conditions in most of the towns and cities were appalling. There was no proper drainage system, and often the sewage was thrown into the streets and left to seep into the water supplies. Just how loathsome and foul-smelling the streets could become is vividly illustrated by a description of Greenock in Renfrewshire as it appeared in a painting holiday isle of mull scotland in 1842.

Not surprisingly, there were frequent epidemics in these early industrial towns. In the 1830s, for example, there was a widespread cholera epidemic, while in 1850s, painting holiday isle of mull scotland, and 1860s there were serious outbreaks of typhus. Initially, the more prosperous citizens in Scotland blamed the habits of the poorer people for these outbreaks, but when the epidemics affected their own areas they began to insist that controls of some sort should be imposed upon the painting holiday isle of mull scotland. Because of this pressure, the Public Health Acts were passed, during the second half of the century, which led to local authorities providing proper water supplies and carry out inspections, and they were given powers to place people suffering from infections and contagious diseases in quarantine. All these measures helped to improve the painting holiday isle of mull scotland situation, and by the end of the century typhus and cholera had been practically eradicated.

Attempts were also made during the nineteenth century to improve conditions of work and painting holiday isle of mull scotland. In the early part of the century men had laboured long hours in atrocious conditions in return for low wages, but succeeding governments and the growing power of the trade unions had steadily reduced hours of work and improved wages and conditions of a painting holiday isle of mull scotland.

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